Dietary Guidelines 101: All You Need to Know 🧐

Key Highlights

  • Nutrition is a critical part of our health and development.
  • There are three types of nutrition in this world: autotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic nutrition.
  • We need different elements of nutrition daily to live and function.

What happens if you have any nutrient deficiency?

Your health sufferers, right?

Why? 🤔

Because our body needs different nutrients in the right amount to stay healthy.

To get these nutrients, we must eat different types of food in the right amounts.

But the problem is, not everyone has the knowledge to choose the right food.

To guide the general public, different health authorities publish dietary guidelines every few years.

In this article, I will discuss everything about the dietary guidelines.

So, let’s dive in. 🧐

Table of Contents

Food Guide, Dietary Guidelines,
In US first Food Guide was released in 1894

What are Dietary Guidelines?

What we eat and drink has an impact on our health. 🥗

And to keep the people healthy and fit, government authorities have the responsibility to guide their citizens.

Because not everyone knows how to choose foods and how to cook them for better health. 

Also, healthcare providers, nutrition educators, policymakers need to know the current best practices for better nutrition.

For this reason, health authorities release dietary guidelines to guide their citizens and organizations.

Now, what is the definition of dietary guidelines? 🤔

Dietary Guidelines are a set of evidence-based food and beverage recommendations to meet nutrient needs, promote health, and prevent disease. [1] 

This is provided by health and wellness authorities for a professional audience, including policymakers, healthcare providers, nutrition educators, and Federal nutrition program operators.

Along with the written dietary guidelines, some authorities also release visual representation for the general public.

There are many shapes of the visual dietary guidelines. For example, triangle shaped food pyramid, plate shaped MyPlate etc.

Nutrition science is evolving every day. 🔬

Recommended: Read about the Nutrition here.

So, dietary guidelines should be released or updated every five or ten years according to the current nutrition science research.

In the US, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), have published the ‘Dietary Guidelines for Americans’ every five years since 1980. [1]

Summary: Nation needs dietary guidelines. Because if its citizens are unhealthy, the country’s growth will be slow. So, the government releases dietary guidelines or food guides every five or ten years.

Facts

Dietary Guidelines Facts

  1. The first dietary guidelines were published by USDA in 1894 through a Farmers Bulletin primarily for factory workers. [2]
  1. The first visual representation of dietary guidelines was released in Sweden in 1974, called the food pyramid. [6]
  1. The first independent dietary guidelines for Americans were published in 1980 by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). [8]
  1. USDA publishes dietary guidelines for Americans every five years. [4]
  1. In the US, the first visual representation of dietary guidelines was published in 1992 by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). [4]
  1. In 2005, USDA and HHS replaced the food pyramid to MyPyramid (a simplified version). [14]
  1. In 2011, USDA and HHS replaced MyPyramid with a more simplified version of the visual dietary guideline, called MyPlate.
  1. The recent dietary guidelines for Americans were published in 2020.[17]
History,

History of the Dietary Guidelines

We were talking about nutrition for centuries.

There are many nutrition guidelines that were released by different experts in the past to deal with different situations like, war time, economic recession.

Let’s talk about the history of dietary guidelines here. 🧐

Note: Every country has their own dietary guideline and history. But the US Dietary guideline was widely accepted as a reference. So, in this article, I will talk only about the history of US dietary guidelines.

1894-1902: Foods: Nutritive Value and Cost

As far as we know, the first dietary guideline was published by USDA in 1894 through a Farmers Bulletin. 📜

The Farmers Bulletin titled ‘Foods: Nutritive Value and Cost’ was written by Dr. Wilbur Olin Atwater, Ph.D., an agricultural chemist and the first director of the Office of Experiment Stations (OES) in USDA. [2]

Atwater developed the dietary guideline that focuses on the factory workers.

Because a survey of the factory workers showed that 50-60% of the income was being spent on food.

Atwater believed that this proportion could be reduced and thus the quality of the workers lives could be improved.

For this reason, Atwater suggested this dietary guideline for American males based on protein, carbohydrate, fat and “mineral matter”.

However, specific minerals and vitamins had not been identified at that time.

This dietary guideline was targeted for less affluent classes. It was built with a less satisfactory and more utilitarian approach to food.

Read/download the 1894’s dietary guideline here. 📝

Summary: In 1894’s USDA’s Farmers Bulletin, Dr. Wilbur Olin Atwater provided some guidance on how to eat healthy on a limited budget.

1902-1916: Principles of Nutrition and Nutritive value of Food

In 1902 USDA’s Farmers Bulletin, titled ‘Principles of Nutrition and Nutritive Value of Food’, Mr. Atwater highlighted the importance of variety, proportionality, and moderation in healthful eating in the diets of American males. [3]

This information preceded the discovery of individual vitamins beginning in 1910.

Atwater’s research also encourages building a separate food guide for the public (not like the previous Farmer’s Bulletin). 👍

Summary: In 1902’s USDA’s Farmers Bulletin, Dr. Wilbur Olin Atwater highlighted the importance of variety, proportionality, and moderation in healthful eating in the diets.

1916: Food for Young Children

Finally, in 1916, the first official USDA’s food guide titled ‘Food for Young Children’ was published by nutritionist Caroline Hunt. [4]

In ‘Food for Young Children’ food guide, foods were categorized into five groups: milk and meat, cereals, vegetables and fruits, fats and fatty foods, and sugars and sugary foods.

As the name suggests, this food guide was focused on the young children.

Summary: In 1916, USDA’s first official food guide was published by nutritionist Caroline Hunt only for the young children.

1917-1933: How to Select Food

As 1916’s dietary guideline was targeted only for young children, in 1917, a new food guide was released by USDA for general public, titled ‘How to Select Food’. [4]

This guide was prepared under the guidance of Hunt and Atwater. 🧐

‘How to Select Food’ food guide also has the same five food groups: milk and meat, cereals, vegetables and fruits, fats and fatty foods, and sugars and sugary foods.

Summary: In 1917, USDA published a new food guide for the general public.

1933-1943: Great Depression Food Plan

‘Food for Young Children’ and ‘How to Select Food’ guides remained popular throughout the 1920’s.

Then the great depression starts. 😔

To counter this, in 1933, the USDA introduced new food plans at four different cost levels.

The plans were outlined in terms of 12 major and affordable food groups to buy and use in a week to meet nutritional needs.

Summary: During the great depression, to guide the public to choose to eat healthy on a limited budget, USDA introduced a new food guide.

1943-1946: A Guide to Good Eating (Basic Seven)

After the great depression, in 1941, President Franklin Roosevelt called the National Nutrition Conference for Defense (National Nutrition Conference for Defense, 1941). 

In that conference, the first set of Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA’s) was released by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academy of Sciences. [4]

These RDA’s listed specific recommended intakes for calories and nine essential nutrients: protein, iron, calcium, vitamins A and D, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and ascorbic acid (vitamin C).

World War II forces countries all over the world to ration food to citizens. 😮

To help Americans maintain nutritional standards under wartime food rationing, the USDA introduced the ‘National Wartime Nutrition Guide’ or ‘Basic Seven’ in 1943 with the phrase “U.S. needs us strong, eat the Basic Seven every day.” [5]

The Basic Seven food groups were:

  1. Green and yellow vegetables (some raw; some cooked, frozen or canned)
  2. Oranges, tomatoes, grapefruit (or raw cabbage or salad greens)
  3. Potatoes and other vegetables and fruits (raw, dried, cooked, frozen or canned)
  4. Milk and milk products (fluid, evaporated, dried milk, or cheese)
  5. Meat, poultry, fish, or eggs (or dried beans, peas, nuts, or peanut butter)
  6. Bread, flour, and cereals (natural whole grain, or enriched or restored)
  7. Butter and fortified margarine (with added Vitamin A)

Although the Basic Seven food guide was more advanced and nutritionally accurate than the original 1916 version, it has several limitations. 

For example, the recommended food servings were missing and consumers found this guide to be pretty complex, according to the USDA.

Summary: In 1943, USDA published a new healthy eating guide to help authorities maintain nutritional standards under wartime food rationing.

1946-1956: National Nutrition Guide

So, in 1946, the Basic Seven food guide was modified with the suggested numbers of food group servings. 

The new Basic Seven was also known as the National Nutrition Guide.

The 1946 version of Basic Seven was widely used for over a decade. [4]

Summary: In 1946, the previous guide was modified and released a new version of healthy eating guide, called, National Nutrition Guide.

1956-1979: Food for Fitness, A Daily Food Guide (Basic Four)

During this time, many other guides were issued from different organizations with contradictory advice. 📚

To counter this confusion, USDA modified the Basic Seven food guide and launched a new food guide, called ‘Basic Four’ in 1956. [4]

Basic Four food guide recommended a minimum serving of foods you need from each of the four food groups: milk, meat, fruits and vegetables, and grain products. [4]

This food guide was widely used for the next two decades.

Summary: In 1956, USDA modified the Basic Seven food guide and launched a new food guide, called ‘Basic Four’.

1972: Sweden’s First Food Guide

Back in the 1970s, Sweden saw an unexpected rise in the food price. 😮

To guide their public to find affordable food, Swedish government tasked The Socialstyrelsen (National Board of Health and Welfare) to come up with a way.

In 1972, Sweden’s National Board of Health and Welfare came up with the idea of a food guide, pulling from the USDA’s “Basic Seven” structure. [6]

The Swedish food guide was divided into two groups: “basic foods” that were both cheap and nutritious, and “supplemental foods” that added nutrition missing from the basic foods.

Summary: In 1972, Sweden’s health authority published a food guide to guide their citizens to choose food in unexpected conditions.

1974: Sweden’s First ‘Food Pyramid’

But with Sweden’s First Food Guide with, supplementary foods may seem like anyone can go without. 

To deal with this, in 1973, Anna Britt Agnsäter, working for Kooperativa Förbundet, chief of the “test kitchen” for Kooperativa Förbundet (a cooperative Swedish retail chain), came up with an idea to visualize the food guide in a triangle-shaped graphical representation.

In 1974 the scheme was officially unveiled to the Swedish populace in Kooperativa Förbundet’s annual magazine, Vi Magazine, under the headline “Good wholesome food at reasonable prices “. [7] 👍

Recommended: Read about the Food Pyramid here.

This first Food Pyramid was made up of 3 parts:

  1. Basic foods including milk, cheese, margarine, bread, cereals and potatoes are placed at the bottom.
  2. Fruits, vegetables, beans and nuts are placed in the middle.
  3. Meat, fish and eggs are placed on the top.

Summary: In 1974, Sweden’s health authority published a visual food guide of 1972’s food guide, called food pyramid for the general public.

1979: Hassle-free Daily Food Guide

Here in the US, by the 1970s, various chronic diseases, like heart disease and stroke were seen. These were related to overconsumption of certain food components like fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium.

In 1979, USDA presented a new food guide, the Hassle-Free Guide to a Better Diet.

This new food guide modified the ‘Basic Four’ to add a new food group – fats, sweets, and alcoholic beverages in moderate consumption.

Summary: In 1979, USDA presented a new food guide, the Hassle-Free Guide to a Better Diet.

1980-1985: (First) Dietary Guidelines for Americans

In 1980, due to a growing number of obesity cases, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published the first edition of ‘Nutrition and Your Health: Dietary Guidelines for Americans’. [8]

The target audience of this dietary guideline are healthy Americans 2 years of age and older.

There are seven guidelines in the first edition of Dietary Guidelines for Americans. [4]

7 Guidelines of the 1980’s Dietary Guideline

  • Eat a variety of foods.
  • Maintain ideal weight.
  • Avoid too much fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol.
  • Eat foods with adequate starch and fiber.
  • Avoid too much sugar.
  • Avoid too much sodium.
  • If you drink alcohol, do so in moderation.

But this dietary guideline was directional, not quantitative. 👎

It faced several criticisms from consumer, commodity, food industry groups, and nutrition scientists.

Read/download the 1980 Dietary Guidelines for Americans here.

Summary: In 1980, USDA released the first Dietary Guidelines for Americans with 7 guidelines.

1984: Food Wheel: A Pattern for Daily Food Choices

Many of the earlier food guides developed by USDA, focused on the foundational diet meet known nutrient needs. 

But with the increasing number of chronic diseases, a need was recognized for a food guide that made food intake suggestions for a “total diet” rather than a “foundation diet”.

For this reason, in 1984, USDA with American Red Cross, released a graphical food guide, titled ‘Food Wheel: A Pattern for Daily Food Choices’ for a Red Cross nutrition course. [4]

But the sad part is the food wheel was not well known. 👎

However, this version of the food guide formed the basis for the Food Guide Pyramid.

Summary: In 1984 USDA published with American Red Cross, released a graphical food guide, focusing on the foundational diet to meet nutrient needs. 

1985-1990: (Second) Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Since 1980, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans have been revised and issued jointly by USDA and HHS every 5 years, after thorough review of its scientific basis by non-governmental experts invited to participate in a Federal Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. 

The second version of the Dietary Guidelines was released in 1985. [9]

The 1985’s dietary guideline was similar to the first one with some added guidance such as following unsafe weight-loss diets, using large-dose supplements, and drinking of alcoholic beverages by pregnant women.

The target audience of this dietary guideline are healthy Americans 2 years of age and older.

It also has seven guidelines. [4]

7 Guidelines of the 1985’s Dietary Guideline

  • Eat a variety of foods.
  • Maintain desirable weight.
  • Avoid too much fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol.
  • Eat foods with adequate starch and fiber.
  • Avoid too much sugar.
  • Avoid too much sodium.
  • If you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation.

Read/download the 1985 Dietary Guidelines for Americans here.

Summary: In 1985, USDA and HHS published the second edition of Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

1990-1995: (Third) Dietary Guidelines for Americans

In 1989, USDA and HHS established a second advisory committee to review the 1985 Dietary Guidelines and make recommendations for revision.

In 1990, USDA and HHS released the modified Dietary Guideline, which promoted enjoyable and healthful eating through variety and moderation, instead of dietary restriction. [10]

The target audience of this dietary guideline are healthy Americans 2 years of age and older.

The 1990’s dietary guideline also has seven guidelines. [4]

7 Guidelines of the 1990’s Dietary Guideline

  • Eat a variety of foods.
  • Maintain healthy weight.
  • Choose a diet low in fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol.
  • Choose a diet with plenty of vegetables, fruits and grain products.
  • Use sugars only in moderation.
  • Use salt and sodium only in moderation.
  •  If you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation.

The Dietary Guidelines brochure provided more practical advice on how to implement the Guidelines in daily food choices by including the food guide. 📃

Read/download the 1990 Dietary Guidelines for Americans here.

Summary: In 1990, USDA and HHS published the third version of Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

1992: Food Guide Pyramid

To simplify the Third ‘Dietary Guidelines for Americans’, in 1992, USDA took inspiration from the Swedish food pyramid and developed a triangle-shaped graphic presentation of 1990’s dietary guidelines. [4]

The graphic was known as the Food Guide Pyramid or Food Pyramid that conveyed the key concepts of the 1990’s guide: variety, proportionality, and moderation.

Since its release, the Food Guide Pyramid has been widely used by nutrition and health professionals, educators, the media, and the food industry. 😃

Government also pushes the message to the general public through posters, textbooks, school curricula, computer software, and on food labels.

Read/download the USDA Food Guide Pyramid here.

Summary: In 1992, USDA introduced a visual version of dietary guidelines, called Food Pyramid.

1995-2000: (Fourth) Dietary Guidelines for Americans

In 1994, the USDA and HHS reviewed the 1990’s Dietary Guideline based on the current scientific knowledge and public feedback.

Finally, in 1995, the fourth edition of dietary guidelines was published. [11]

The target audience of this dietary guideline are healthy Americans 2 years of age and older.

It also has the 7 dietary guidelines. [4]

7 Guidelines of the 1995’s Dietary Guideline

  • Eat a variety of foods.
  • Balance the food you eat with physical activity – maintain or improve your weight.
  • Choose a diet with plenty of vegetables, fruits and grain products.
  • Choose a diet low in fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol.
  • Choose a diet moderate in sugars
  • Choose a diet moderate in salt and sodium.
  • If you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation.

For the first time, the fourth edition of Dietary Guidelines brochure was also made available electronically through the World Wide Web. 🌐

Read/download the 1995 Dietary Guidelines for Americans here.

Summary: In 1990, USDA and HHS published the fourth version of Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

2000-2005: (Fifth) Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Since 1980, Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Department Health and Human Services (DHHS), have jointly issued and updated the Dietary Guidelines for Americans every 5 years. 

In 1998, USDA and DHHS selected 11 nutrition scientists and physicians to serve on the 2000 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee.

The Committee was responsible for reviewing and updating the 1995 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

After 1½ year of review and 4 meetings, in May 2000, Secretaries of USDA and HHS released a 40-page consumer booklet entitled, Nutrition and Your Health: Dietary Guidelines for Americans. [12]

It is the 5th Edition of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

This booklet evolved from the previous 4×9 inch brochures to a larger 8½ x 11 inch booklet. 📃

It has 10 guidelines. [13]

10 Guidelines of the 2000’s Dietary Guideline

  1. Aim for a healthy weight
  2. Be physically active each day
  3. Let the Pyramid guide your food choices
  4. Choose a variety of grains daily, especially whole grains
  5. Choose a variety of fruits and vegetables daily
  6. Keep food safe to eat
  7. Choose a diet that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol and moderate in total fat
  8. Choose beverages and foods to moderate your intake of sugars
  9. Choose and prepare foods with less salt
  10. If you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation

Read/download the 2000 Dietary Guidelines for Americans here.

Summary: In 2000, USDA and HHS published the fifth version of Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

2005-2010: (Sixth) Dietary Guidelines for Americans and MyPyramid Food Guidance System

In 2003, the HHS and USDA Secretaries selected 13 nutrition scientists and physicians to build the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee for 2005.

The committee did extensive research on the current issues of diet and physical activity to health promotion and chronic disease prevention.

After a year of review and 5 meetings, the Committee submitted their final report to DHHS and USDA. [14]

After analyzing the report, on January 12, 2005, the Secretaries of HHS and USDA released an 80-page policy document and 10-page consumer brochure.

The policy document was intended primarily for use by policymakers, healthcare providers, nutritionists, and nutrition educators. This is the first time USDA and DHHS released a policy document.

Along with the dietary guideline update, USDA and HHS also updated the 1992’s Food Guide Pyramid.

They simplified the look and included daily amounts of food at 12 calorie levels. 🙂

New MyPyramid Food Guidance System added a band for oils and the concept of physical activity.

In the MyPyramid, experts used to describe concepts of variety, moderation, and proportion.

Read/download the 2005 policy of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans here.

The consumer brochure was for the general population, titled ‘Finding Your Way to a Healthier You’.

Read/download the 2005 consumer brochure of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans here.

Summary: In 2005, USDA and HHS published the sixth version of Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

2011-2015: (Seventh) Dietary Guidelines for Americans & MyPlate

To update the Dietary Guidelines 2005, a committee was built in 2009.

The committee submitted the report in May 2010.  [15]

After a year of review and 6 meetings USDA and HHS Announce New Dietary Guidelines.

Along with this guideline, a visual representation of a food guide was also launched, known as MyPlate. 

In 2011, First Lady Michelle Obama and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack made the announcement that the almost 20-year-old food pyramid would be replaced by a new icon: MyPlate.

The icon emphasizes fruits, vegetables, grains, proteins and dairy groups. 🥗 🥛

“My” continues the personalization approach from MyPyramid.

The idea was meant to prompt people to “think about building a healthy plate at meal times and to seek more information to help them,” such as visiting the MyPlate website where specific groups of foods were broken down into nutrients, health benefits, suggested daily amounts, and tips to eating new foods.

As a reminder for healthy eating, MyPlate encourages people to focus on variety, amount, and nutrition. 

You can access the online version of MyPlate here: https://www.myplate.gov/

Summary: In 2011, USDA and HHS published the seventh version of Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

2015-2020: (Eighth) Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Beginning in 1990, Congress mandated that HHS and USDA release a new edition at least every five years.

So, in order to release 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, a new Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee was formed in 2015.

This committee submitted its recommendations to USDA and HHS in order to inform the 2015 edition of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. [16]

After reviewing and analyzing, USDA and HHS developed the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015 and released on 7 January, 2016. 🙂

6 Guidelines of the 2015’s Dietary Guideline

  1. Follow a healthy eating pattern across the lifespan. 
  2. Focus on variety, nutrient density, and amount
  3. Limit calories from added sugars and saturated fats and
  4. reduce sodium intake.
  5. Shift to healthier food and beverage choices.
  6. Support healthy eating patterns for all. 

Read/download the 2015 official Dietary Guidelines for Americans here

Summary: In 2015, USDA and HHS published the eighth version of Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

2020-2025: (Ninth) Dietary Guidelines for Americans

This is the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

In order to develop the 2020 Dietary Guidelines, a Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) was formed with a group of nominated individuals.

They reviewed the current nutrition research and drafted a scientific report to the USDA and HHS to develop the final guidelines in July 2020.

Finally, in December 2020, USDA and HHS released the new Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) which will last till 2025. [17]

According to USDA, Dietary Guidelines have evolved over the decades, it isn’t about focusing on individual foods or food groups. 

The slogan of 2020 DGA is ‘Make every bite count with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans’.

4 Guidelines of the 2020’s Dietary Guideline

Follow a healthy dietary pattern at every life stage.

  1. Customize and enjoy nutrient-dense food and beverage choices to reflect personal preferences, cultural traditions, and budgetary considerations.
  2. Focus on meeting food group needs with nutrient-dense foods and beverages,
  3. and stay within calorie limits.
  4. Limit foods and beverages higher in added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium, and limit alcoholic beverages.

They also recommend the MyPlate as a Guide to Support Healthy Dietary Patterns.

Read/download the 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans here.

It is released along with several infographics and graphics. See here. 🙂

Summary: In 2020, USDA and HHS published the ninth version of Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

The next Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2025 DGA) is expected to be released in December 2025.

Healthy Food,
Healthy eating can improve health and prevent diseases

Importance of Dietary Guidelines

Do you know why every nation needs an official dietary guideline?

Do you know why the government should publish the dietary guidelines?

Let’s find out. 🧐

There are many situations a country or nation goes through. For example, economic slowdown, food shortage, war, pandemic or growing health conditions.

A dietary guideline is needed to guide the public and different organizations in such situations, so that they can follow healthy eating.

Because healthy eating can improve health and prevent diseases.

Now, why does the government have the responsibility? 🤔

Because, when the government releases the dietary guidelines for the nation, the public trusts it. 

It will create a nation-wide standard policy which provides consistency across organizations and allows health-care workers, nutrition educators, school boards, and eldercare facilities to improve nutrition and subsequently the health of their respective populations. 

The dietary guidelines are developed after analyzing thousands of scientific journal articles by a consensus panel with the overall mission of improving the health of the nation. 

Summary: Dietary guidelines are important for the health of the nation. Because the health of a nation largely depends on its citizens.

Nutrition, Covid-19 Diet, NutritionCrown Enterprise, Company
Dietary guideline helps to build a nation-wide standard Food Policy

The Final Word

Dietary guidelines are important for the nation. ⚕️

Without it, there is no nation-wide standard policy for nutrition.

 Despite the great advances in dietary guidelines, most countries suffer from malnutrition, weather from poor nutrition or over nutrition. 👶

That is why everyone should follow their respective country’s dietary guidelines. 👍

References

This article is written by a certified nutritionist and verified by scientific evidence. ☑️

We rely on reputed and specialized media sites, academic research institutions, peer-reviewed studies, government agencies, and medical associations to source information. 📰

We avoid using tertiary references. Know more about how we ensure our content is accurate and current by reading our editorial policy. 🧐

Following are the references of this article. 

  1. Health.gov: About the Dietary Guidelines. Accessed 10 August 2021.
  2. Archive.org: Foods : nutritive value and cost. Accessed 10 August 2021.
  3. Archive.org: Principles of nutrition and nutritive value of food. Accessed 10 August 2021.
  4. USDA.gov: Dietary Recommendations and How They Have Changed Over Time. Accessed 10 August 2021.
  5. Google News: To Demonstrate “Basic Seven” Diet. Accessed 10 August 2021.
  6. TodayIFoundOut: WHO INVENTED THE FOOD PYRAMID? Accessed 10 August 2021.
  7. Archive.org: KF Provkök lanserar idén om basmat. Accessed 10 August 2021.
  8. USDA.Gov: Dietary Guidelines 1980. Accessed 10 August 2021.
  9. USDA.Gov: Dietary Guidelines 1985. Accessed 10 August 2021.
  10. USDA.Gov: Dietary Guidelines 1990. Accessed 10 August 2021.
  11. USDA.Gov: Dietary Guidelines 1995. Accessed 10 August 2021.
  12. USDA.Gov: Dietary Guidelines 2000. Accessed 10 August 2021.
  13. USDA.Gov: DIETARY GUIDELINES FOR AMERICANS, 1980 TO 2000. Accessed 10 August 2021.
  14. Health.gov: 2005 Dietary Guidelines. Accessed 10 August 2021.
  15. USDA.Gov: Report of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010. Accessed 10 August 2021.
  16. USDA.Gov: 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee Submits Report. Accessed 10 August 2021.
  17. DietaryGuidelines.gov: The 2020-2025 Edition is Here! Accessed 10 August 2021.

A. R. Choudhury is a IGNOU certified nutritionist in India with a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Biochemistry. He also has considerable research experience and additional certificates in nutrition. 👍  Abdur started NutritionCrown in 2020 to organize nutrition information under one umbrella. ☂️  He is passionate about empowering people to make well-informed food choices to support their health. Abdur currently lives in India and keeps fit by weight training and eating mainly home-cooked meals. 💪 🥗